March 9, 2021

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2 hours ago

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Photos of the dayOn this date in 1968 The Who play the Grande Ballroom in Detroit, Michigan with Electric Prunes opening. At this show The Who add "Little Billy" to their show list. They also break all attendance records for the ballroom.Thanks to Marc Starcke for allowing us to share his collection of photos from this show!www.facebook.com/marc.starcke/media_set?set=a.10211884630020691&type=3 ... See MoreSee Less
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5 hours ago

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Today in Whostory: 3/09/20211963 - The Detours play Osterley Hotel in Isleworth1965 - The Who play The Marquee Club in London1966 - The Who play the Town Hall in Farnborough1968 - The Who play the Grande Ballroom in Detroit, Michigan with Electric Prunes opening. At this show The Who add "Little Billy" to their show list. They also break all attendance records for the ballroom.1968 - New Musical Express article: "Ann Moses meets The Who"$*$about meeting between The Who and the editor of Tiger Beat. Mention is made of the American Cancer Society ads.1975 - John and his band The Ox is the headlining act at Century II in Buffalo, New York for promoter Harvey Weinstein1976 - The Who play the Boston Garden in Boston, Massachusetts. The show is stopped after only two songs when Keith passes out. They reschedule the show for the end of the tour (April 1)1981 - The Who play the first of three nights at Wembley Arena in Wembley, London1996 - The John Entwistle Band play in Denver, Colorado1998 - An expanded and re-ordered version of Odds and Sods is released on CD in the U.K. The U.S. issue comes out the following day.1998 - The gay-themed film Like It Is premiers at the London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival. Roger plays Kelvin, a gay music promoter2006 - Pete again performs on In The Attic, premiering a new song from his The Boy Who Heard Music mini-opera, "Pick Up The Peace"2007 - The Who play the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City, New Jersey2010 - Roger opens for Eric Clapton at the Gwinnett Center near Atlanta2012 - Roger plays at Il Gran Teatro GEOX in Padua, Italy ... See MoreSee Less
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17 hours ago

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Image of the dayOn this date in 2010 Roger opens for Eric Clapton at the RBC Center in Raleigh ... See MoreSee Less
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18 hours ago

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Photos of the dayOn this date in 2009 Keith Moon is honored with an historical blue plaque at the site of the Marquee Club in Soho. The Heritage Foundation stepped in to post the plaque after English Heritage, the traditional award of blue plaques, refused saying Keith did not meet their criteria. The unveiling is attended by Roger and Keith's mother, Kitgettyimages has photos from the event here:www.gettyimages.com/photos/the-who-march-8-2009?phrase=%22The%20Who%22%20March%208%202009&sort=be... ... See MoreSee Less
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19 hours ago

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Concert of the dayOn this date in 2007 The Who play the Verizon Center in Washington, DCYou can watch the show on youtube starting here www.youtube.com/watch?v=S7xr4U0xMus&list=PLB70FD3E2557506D5&index=2&t=0s ... See MoreSee Less
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20 hours ago

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Photos of the dayOn this date in 2006 Pete and Roger hold a photo-op at the Hard Rock Café in Piccadilly announcing that they will be headlining the Sunday night concert at the Hyde Park Calling Festival on 3 Julygettyimages has photos from the event here: www.gettyimages.com/photos/the-who-march-8-2006-hyde-park-calling-festival?phrase=%22the%20who%22... ... See MoreSee Less
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21 hours ago

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Video of the dayOn this date in 1996 Pete appears on the U.K. TV programme TFI Friday ... See MoreSee Less
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22 hours ago

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Single of the dayOn this date in 1986 Roger's tribute to Keith Moon "Under a Raging Moon" backed with "Move Better In The Night," hits the British charts and peaks at #43. ... See MoreSee Less
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23 hours ago

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Article of the dayOn this date in 1975 Keith's forthcoming solo album Two Sides Of The Moon receives a favorable review in Melody Maker. The article also includes a photo of Iggy Pop riding on Keith's backTranscription: In the last six months, he's jammed with Ray Manzarek at the Whiskey, played with John Sebastian at the Troubadour and recently, at the same club, joined Flo & Eddie along with Alice Cooper to sing 'Woolly Bully', and 'Happy Together'.The other night, he was in top hat and tails to catch Steve Harley's American debut.Keith Moon is alive and living well in Los Angeles. He's recently finished his first solo album, Two Sides Of The Moon, and socially he's been all over the city.The album is, perhaps surprisingly, intelligent and carefully devised, not one of the usual self-indulgent solo affairs by superstars who frankly have nothing to say outside the context of their group. With the exception of a couple of tunes, Keith's LP is excellent, and perfect for the car radio in LA, New York or England.Producer Skip Taylor wasn't either in awe of the surrounding talent or unsure how to handle rock's better musicians. "I didn't even know Keith before we started working together," says Taylor."I met Keith at the Record Plant when I was doing Arthur Lee's Reel To Real album. He came into the studio to do an overdub on 'Be Thankful For What You Got'. It didn't come off."I said, 'Keith, it's not happening and let's not waste our time.' He said, 'Hey, I really appreciate you being honest. Most people, because I'm Keith Moon, would have made me go on till I got it right or keep the track because Keith Moon played on it.'"I watch a lot of people in the studio who handle the 'Superstars,' with kid gloves, Keith is an intelligent, sensible guy. And this album shows it. He knows right from wrong. He's been in the business for 10 years."The album is one of his most successful projects to date. Nevertheless, this is Moon's album and Taylor fully realises this, allowing the performer plenty of room to breathe.Two Sides Of The Moon doesn't have any self-penned tunes by the illustrious Moon, though one would have thought that his previous Who efforts, 'Cobwebs', 'Wasp Man', and 'Tommy's Holiday Camp', did show the comic novelty element of Keith. "I didn't feel the need to write any songs for the album," he replies. "Everybody else seemed to put down what I felt a damn sight better than what I could've done."There are songs that I listened to and liked and wanted to work with. I like all the songs for different reasons. There's a lot of light and shade on the albums. I like the rock and roll tunes because it's rock and roll, and the ballads because they're ballads. I'm really knocked out by the album. I don't think I could have done it any better."Keith picked a lot of songs that vocally he could control, and songs that meant something to him."On some tracks I didn't play drums, and on some tracks I didn't sing the lead."I recorded 'Don't Worry Baby' because it's one of my all time favourites. It's as relevant today as when it was written. I did 'In My Life' because it's a great song. KRTH (LA's oldies but goodies station) played it, and it was the first time I'd heard it on the radio in years."It seemed to have gotten lost and I thought I'd take a different approach to it, doing it the way which suits my voice best and the way I thought it should be sung."The album allows Moon the opportunity to display many of his surf and country western influences. But Keith is a rocker at heart and, rightfully, this LP rocks out at a furious pace. Most importantly, he has established a distinct musical identity, one that reflects all of the brashness and effervescence of his drumming with the Who, yet now is effectively placed in its own creative setting.The list of who is on the album is as long as your arm: Rick Nelson and the Stone Canyon Band, Joe Walsh, Jesse Ed Davis, Klaus Voorman, Danny Kootch, John Sebastian, Fanny, Flo & Eddie, Clydie King, Ringo, Harry Nilsson, and many more.But there are no drum solos. "No, I hate drum solos. Drum solos are the most boring, time-consuming things. I don't think the drums are a solo instrument. Drums are there to set the beat for the music."I like playing with friends but my love is on the stage or theatrical drumming and not drum solos or session work. I'm not used to being told to play a certain way. I'm a lousy session musician. I wouldn't play with anybody who'd ask me to play like that."Keith's lively, Who-style drumming is noticeably absent on the LP, but it's left out intentionally to keep Two Sides from resembling the patented Who format. Only during 'The Kids Are Alright' does Moon let loose with a burning percussion attack, augmented by Joe Walsh's fiery Townshend-like power chords."I think I do the definitive version. I think the lead singer could have been better the first time 'round (haha)."Side one opens with 'Crazy Like A Fox', written by Al Staehely (formerly of Spirit). Done at breakneck speed, the song is the perfect album-opener, and clocks in at 2.02.Next comes 'Solid Gold', a nostalgic rocker recorded by Fanny and penned by member Nicky Barclay. Halfway through the first side is the vastly improved, re-worked version of 'Don't Worry Baby', which flopped as a single last autumn, and originally had Moon in an uncomfortable musical setting. This time the tune is faster, with a female chorus that gives us the closest thing to a Brian Wilson-Keith Moon-Phil Spector record that has ever been done. "I wanted to get the Ronettes to sing on that record but they were in Las Vegas."Next we find Keith venturing into country and western land with a delightful arrangement of 'One Night Stand', written by Dennis Larden (formerly of Every Mother's Son and now in the Rick Nelson Band), with Nelson sharing the lead vocals.The side ends with 'The Kids Are All Right'.Side two begins with a new John Lennon song, 'Move Over Ms. L', possibly the strongest track on the album. It's easily Lennon's most explosive rocker since leaving the Beatles. Keith knows it too, and takes full advantage by using Jo Jo Gunne.'Teenage Idol' with Rick Nelson sharing vocal duties again is next, followed by 'Back Door Sally', which sounds right out of the Little Richard songbook. It should, since it was written by John Marascalco, author of 'Rip It Up'.'In My Life', the old Beatle classic, is done in a narrative, Richard Harris style.The album's closing track, 'Together', written by Harry Nilsson, serves as a musical introduction piece to the whole album. Funny, light, and highly reminiscent of the 'Intro Outro' by the Bonzos.Would the success of this album prompt Keith to do another? "Oh yes, there are already plans for that in the future." Perhaps a tour? "Well, I've been thinking about that. I'd like to go out and take a few theatres and put on some shows. That's part of my job. Playing live, that's what I enjoy more than anything else. However, the Who always comes first."Over the last few years, Keith has gone into films: 200 Motels, Dracula, That'll Be The Day, Stardust, and now the film version of Tommy. Did he have any favourite roles or prefer one picture to another?"I loved doing Uncle Ernie in Tommy. Most of my roles, such as in Stardust, didn't require any acting because it was something I've been through. It was just a matter of going through the motions with the camera present. Uncle Ernie was a character that Ken Russell and I created, a character that I had built the costume for and decided what kind of personality he'd have."I loved working with Ken Russell. What he does is place a lot of faith in the actors."It's a very dramatic film. I haven't seen it in its entirety, but from the rushes I've seen I think it will be one of the most outstanding films of the decade."Tommy never stopped growing. When Pete was writing it he got to a point where he was saying, 'Where do I go from here?' We were sitting in a boozer in London, which is most unlike us, throwing ideas around. And I said, 'Well, what about a holiday camp?' So it was 'Tommy's Holiday Camp'. This is how the Who works. Everybody contributes, everybody is part of what we are involved in. The involvement is total, with no one person in control."Everybody labours under the misconception that Pete Townshend is the leader of the band. There is no leader. It's the Who."We're a group. Each individual is one fourth of the whole."Keith is very involved in working towards the silver screen. "I'm going to take some drama classes. The projection is different in film than on stage. The gestures you have to transmit at Madison Square Garden have to be big, whereas on film you can accomplish the same on a much smaller scale. I'd like to involve myself more in acting. Learn the different aspects about it. There's a lot of talent in our group. Wait 'till you see Roger in Tommy."Looking into the immediate future, Keith smiled: "I'm going to the Champagne Festival in France. It's kind of like a Mardi Gras. I'll be there for a couple of weeks. I think most of the boys will be there, just by intuition. Then we're gonna fly back and start working on a new Who album, a tour of Europe, and then the States, probably, in the summer."Looking back over the last 10 years, does Moon have any favourite Who songs or albums? "Well, Sell Out and parts of Quadrophenia. To me, these works express the way the Who is. It really depends what mood I'm in. I've forgotten half the stuff we've done, and all of a sudden I'll hear one of our old numbers on KRTH and I'll remember it. That's why the band is still together. The band is never the same band. The personnel may be the same but the music never is. The songs are never played the same twice." ... See MoreSee Less
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24 hours ago

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Concert of the dayOn this date in 1975 John and his band The Ox is the headlining act at New York City's Academy Of MusicAd courtesy of www.thewhothismonth.com. "Review" from the New York Times ... See MoreSee Less
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1 day ago

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Article of the dayOn this date in 1970 The New York Times publishes an advance review of Live at Leeds by Nik Cohn in which he calls it "...the definitive hard-rock holocaust. It is the best live rock album ever made."Transcription:AFTER a year of almost continual touring, The Who have been taking a break these last weeks and, out of this respite, they've come up with a new single, The Seeker, and a new live album. Both are at the final‐mix stage and should be released within a month.The Seeker is a Pete Townshend song, as Who singles hay e always been, and is a strange confusion; musically, it's nothing, just a rehash of the traditional Who tear‐up, loud and strong and brutal, another “Call Me Lightning” or “Magic Bus,” except that it's not as good. It does carry a certain excitement but the tune is tired and the whole sound has been done before, very many times. The more you hear it, the more you the staleness.But if the music is a throw away, the lyrics are very obviously meant. As in quite a few of Townshend's songs, notably “I Can See For Miles,” they're an odd mixture of arrogance and fright, half way between a boast and a confession:I guessed Bobby Dylan.I guessed the Beatles.I guessed Timothy Leary.He couldn't help me even.They call me The Seeker.I've been searching all nightAnd I won't get to getwhat I'm after Until the day I Die.And again:Focusing on nowhere, Investigating miles.I'm The Seeker.I'm a really desperate man.”This has always been Townshend's major problem as a writer, that lyrics come very much easier to him than original tunes and, in the past, he has taken time to get his melody lines up to standard. With The Seeker, however, he has been under great pressure from his record labels, who have waited a year since the last Who single, and he's forced to slam it out regardless, warts and all. As Townshend him self admits, it's a waste.There are no such difficulties with the album. Quite simply, it is the best live rock album ever made, even stronger than the still unreleased “Rolling Stones Concert,” currently circulating underground.It was recorded at two consecutive shows in Hull and Leeds, tough Yorkshire towns that have been Who strong holds ever since the days of I can't explain, and features roughly the same act that the group used on its last American tour, except that it misses out “Tommy,” their opera. Apart from their old hits, “Substitute,” and “Happy Jack” and “I'm a Boy,” “Magic Bus” and “My Generation,” there is a John Ent whistle song (“Heaven and Hell”), a couple of songs off past albums (“Tattoo” and “Young Man's Blues”) and three revived rock classics from the fifties (“Fortune Teller,” “Summertime Blues” and “Shakin’ All Over”). Without exception, they are shatteringly loud, crude and vicious, entirely excessive. Without exception, they'reFor the first time, the full force of the group has been caught on record, their un equaled ferocity and power. Somehow, whenever they've gone into the studio, they have softened up. The album of “Tommy,” for instance, is a whole different work from the opera live, much subtler, more complex and more original but also slightly masked, held back, as though Townshend had suddenly been ashamed of all the obsessions and neuroses that produced his music in the first place and had tried to cover them up.On the live album, though, there is no defensiveness at all. The sound is rough, the balance varies and some of the vocals verge on incoherence. There are also bum notes and missed cues, screwed‐up harmonies and moments of general shambles and, finally, none of it matters in the least there is so much energy here, such de monic speed that any other standards are made meaning less. In the end, all that counts is the impact and that's quite shattering.On “My Generation,” especially, Townshend lets fly with his full repertoire of guitar assassination, the strings tortured against the amps, the neck smashed over his knee, the scream and howl of the feedback. It's flat‐out apocalypse, just the way it used to be five years ago, when he wore his Union Jack jacket and used his guitar like a machine gun, turning it on his audience and slaughtering them one by one, his face white with fury.Later on, a lot of that initial anger got ritualized. Dutifully smashing his guitar night after night, it became a bore, a piece of hokum. But in the beginning, the rage was real and now on this album, it sounds real again.(The point about The Who's violence, the reason why it doesn't feel squalid, is that it carries such surprise and precision. Unlike the hard‐rock groups that have followed them, Blue Cheer or Led Zeppelin, say, they don't go in for slow mutilation, wrestling a song to the ground and then bludgeoning it and tearing it, stomping all over it, until it has been mashed beyond all recognition. Instead, their brutality is fast and total, like a one punch knockout or a clean kill in a bullfight. On its own terms, it carries elegance, range, humor and, yes, beauty.)At any rate, Townshend himself seems very pleased with the album, all the more so because he's been going through a period of some con fusion. Obviously, the success of “Tommy” has brought him praise, prestige and, not least, money, but it has also left him directionless. On the one hand, he doesn't want to continue along the lines set down by “Tommy,” becoming more and more cerebral, more and more the pet poodle of the intellectual critics; on the other hand, having knocked out a full‐length opera, it feels flat to go back to straightforward rock ‘n’ roll singles.In fact, this problem has always existed Townshend is intelligent, creative, highly complex and much given to mystic ponderings, but the things that he values most in rock are its basic explosions, its noise and flash and image: Elvis Presley on his golden Cadillac, Mick Jagger doing the splits, Pete Townshend with his machine‐gun guitar. So he writes stuff like “Tom my,” sophisticated as it is, and he can see that it's good but, at the same time, he feels that it's a cop‐out from all the things that rock lives off, almost a betrayal. And he goes out on stage and he smashes his guitar, simple, mindless‐release. But then he gets his breath back and he knows that that's ‐ not it either, to deny his own brain. And so it goes on, round andMeanwhile, of course, the listener is winning on both counts. With “Tommy,” he got rock's first formal masterpiece and now, with the live album, he gets the definitive hard‐rock holocaust. ... See MoreSee Less
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1 day ago

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Question of the dayOn this date in 1968 The Who reportedly play the Metropolitan Sports Center near Minneapolis, Minnesota. Did anyone attend this show? Anyone from the Minneapolis area with any information about this show? Willing to search your local library archives.I'm asking because I did find evidence of a concert at the "Metropolitan Sports Center" - but no mention of The Who playing it. Perhaps The Who played a different venue that night? Perhaps they played that venue on a different date? Perhaps they played this concert and nobody remembers? I've reviewed online archives of "The Minneapolis Star" and the "Star Tribune" and haven't found anything but this ad. ... See MoreSee Less
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1 day ago

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Today in Whostory: 3/08/20211964 - The Who play St. Mary's Hall in Putney1968 - The Who reportedly play the Metropolitan Sports Center near Minneapolis, Minnesota. Did anyone attend this show? I'm not finding any evidence that it occurred, and in fact found some evidence that this arena was used for another concert "on this date". Anyone from the Minneapolis area have any information or willingness to search their local library for any more information?1970 - The New York Times publishes an advance review of Live at Leeds by Nik Cohn in which he calls it "...the definitive hard-rock holocaust. It is the best live rock album ever made."1971 - The Who hold the fourth and last session of the ill-fated Lifehouse project. Filming still has not begun, the band is completely confused about Pete's plans, the audience is uncooperative, mostly calling out for old Who tunes during the new Lifehouse songs, and producer/manager Kit Lambert is openly critical, stamping about and yelling, "What in the hell are we doing here?" Since Lambert is due to travel to New York the next week to produce Labelle's first album at the Record Plant, he suggests The Who fly over and record the new material there as well.1975 - John and his band The Ox is the headlining act at New York City's Academy Of Music1975 - BBC Radio 1's Rock Week broadcasts Pete's 2 1/2 hour radio special previewing the soundtrack to Tommy: The Movie1975 - Keith's forthcoming solo album Two Sides Of The Moon receives a favorable review in Melody Maker. The article also includes a photo of Iggy Pop riding on Keith's back1986 - Roger's tribute to Keith Moon "Under a Raging Moon" backed with "Move Better In The Night," hits the British charts and peaks at #43.1996 - The John Entwistle Band play the Buffalo Rose in Golden, Colorado1996 - Pete appears on the U.K. TV programme TFI Friday. The host says that before filming the episode, Pete remarked that he "hated every second of being in The Who." Pete confirms the statement.2000 - Roger appears with the British Rock Symphony appearing at the Brisbane Entertainment Center2006 - Pete and Roger hold a photo-op at the Hard Rock Café in Piccadilly announcing that they will be headlining the Sunday night concert at the Hyde Park Calling Festival on 3 July2007 - The Who play the Verizon Center in Washington, DC2009 - Keith Moon is honored with an historical blue plaque at the site of the Marquee Club in Soho. The Heritage Foundation stepped in to post the plaque after English Heritage, the traditional award of blue plaques, refused saying Keith did not meet their criteria. The unveiling is attended by Roger and Keith's mother, Kit2010 - Roger opens for Eric Clapton at the RBC Center in Raleigh ... See MoreSee Less
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2 days ago

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Photos of the dayOn this date in 2018 Roger Daltrey performs at the Hard Rock in Las Vegas, NevadaThanks to Marc Starcke for allowing me to share his collection of photos from this show!www.facebook.com/marc.starcke/media_set?set=a.10215139090300164&type=3 ... See MoreSee Less
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2 days ago

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Concert of the dayOn this date in 2016 The Who play the TD Garden in Boston, MassachusettsVisit our friends at petetownshend.net for more informationpetetownshend.net/gigography/the-who-hits-50-tour/the-who-at-boston-td-garden ... See MoreSee Less
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2 days ago

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Album of the dayOn this date in 2008 the compilation CD 20th Century Masters: The Who is awarded Platinum status by the RIAA. ... See MoreSee Less
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2 days ago

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Album of the dayOn this date in 2006 "Roger Daltrey Gold" is released in the U.S ... See MoreSee Less
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2 days ago

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Album of the dayOn this date in 1988 the compilation Who's Better Who's Best is released in Britain as a CD and a single vinyl LP disc. It peaks at #10. ... See MoreSee Less
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2 days ago

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Album of the dayOn this date in 1987 Pete's second collection of his demos Another Scoop is released to generally poor reviews. It peaks in the U.S. at #198. Released at the same time is a promo single of "Ask Yourself" backed with "Brooklyn Kids." ... See MoreSee Less
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