October 30, 2020

1976-03-23 – The Los Angeles Times

1976 03 23 The_Los_Angeles_Times_Tue__Mar_23__1976_

ROGER DALTREY
. . .strutting, stallionlike.

POP MUSIC REVIEW

The Who

in Anaheim

BY ROBERT HILBURN
Times Pop Music Critic

For those who had never seen the Who live, it must
have been a precious moment Sunday when Keith Moon
raced on stage with the band shortly before 6 pm. at An-
aheim Stadium and did a somersault in front of his drums.
It helped bring some life to a show that had been a long
time in reaching its peak.

Many in the mostly young, capacity crowd of 55.000
had been waiting eight hours or more—through three
supporting acts, a series of aerial/acrobatic stunts and

warm March day—for the Who to arrive.

Because Rufus had another concert Sunday night in At-
lanta and needed to catch an early flight, the soul-based
group opened the show at 1:15 rather than the scheduled
Steve Gibbons Band. Led by Chaka Khan, a singer with
exceptional range and strikingly adventurous vocal in-
stincts. Rufus played a tight, varied set but fell victim to
the same kind of semi-indifferent response, that audiences
usually offer opening acts in such large outdoor situations.

Gibbons Band, Then Little Feat

Though it, too. played with punch and aggressiveness.
the English, blues-based Gibbons Band fared little better
with the audience in its local debut. Little Feat, which
came next, drew more response with its brand of South-
em-fried rock.

But the between-act stunts—first. Art Scholl's aerial
dips and dives and Jumpin' Joe Gerlach's ll-story leap
into a bed-sized sponge—were one-two on the applause
meter (until the Who arrived) on a day when the heat
made the audience seem particularly concerned with con-
serving its energy. At one point the stadium message
board read: "A Friendly Reminder: Sun Burns Your Skin."

By the time Moon and the Who came on stage. the sun
—mercifully—had gone down. But the audience. finally,
was coming up. When measured against the audience's
passive manner earlier in the day, the roar of enthusiasm
and celebration that greeted the Who, in fact. was remin-
iscent of people who leap out of closets or adjoining rooms
at a surprise birthday party.

There was, of course. reason for the enthusiasm. The
Who is one of the three or four groups to whom the term
"world's greatest rock 'n' roll band" has been applied with
any degree of validity or consensus.

Please Turn to Page II. Col. 1

HAVING A BALL-The heat was on at An-
aheim Stadium Sunday, but most of the capa-

crowd of 55,000 who went to see the
Who hung in there for the six-hour-plus show.

Times photos by Penni Gladstone

city

4 EACH FOR ‘DYBBUK,’ ‘ARE YOU NOW”

LA. Drama Critics9 Circle Awards

BY SYLVIE DRAKE
Times Staff Writer

For the seventh time in as many years, the Los Angeles
Drama Critics' Circle passed out its awards Sunday. For
the third time. the dinner event took place in the Versail-
les Room of Pike's Verdugo Oaks in Glendale. And for the
first time, things got off to a flying musical start. thanks
to singer-composer Billy Barnes, emcee for the occasion.
who did splendidly what he does best. Barnes composed
and sang some very special material that thoroughly
roasted the members of the Circle who, God knows, have
it coming (well. once a year at least). It set a wholesome
tongue-in-cheek tone for the elegant and well-attended
evening.

It was a glowing occasion with an unusually high num-
ber of awards distributed before the evening was out. A

total of 32 regular awards and three previously an-
nounced special awards were presented for distinguished
theatrical achievement. The nonsexist LADCC indulges in
a necessary separation by categories but is adamant in the
fact that there can be no "bests" in the creative arts. Ap-
ples and oranges mix but cannot be compared—only ap-
preciated on their individual terms.

Statistical fallout—a potluck affair—seemed eminently
equitable this year. Of the 32 awards, 14 went to Equity
productions in major theaters and 18 to theaters of less
than 400 seats and 99-seat Equity-waiver theaters. 'I‘ied at
the top of the list were the Center Theater Group-Mark
Taper Forum's production of "The Dybbuk" and "Are You

Please Turn to Page l2. Col. I