October 26, 2020

2012-03-24 – The Palm Beach Post

2012 03 24 The_Palm_Beach_Post_Sat__Mar_24__2012_

|_|Z SMITH
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“TOMMY, CAN you see
me? Tommy, can you hear
me?”

Those are the famous
lyrics from the 1969 rock
opera Tommy, sprung
from the fertile minds,
voices and musicianship
of Pete Townshend, Roger
Daltrey and
the late Keith
Moon.

Now we
hear that
Glee producer

Ryan Murphy
plans a lavish

remake of
Tommy for
the hit Fox

show that
has lost a
little of its
heat recently.
The Tommy
episode, if
it happens, will no doubt
run longer than the usual
hour. It’s hard to imagine
something as epic as
Tommy cut down.

Daltrey, who can still

look awfully good in skin-
tight denim, and Townsh-
end are expected to make
appearances.

PS. Don’t be disap-
pointed if the Glee version
of Tommy is not as lurid
as Ken Russell’s infamous,
excessive 1975 big—screen
effort. (That one featured
Jack Nicholson,TinaTurner
as “The Acid Queen,”

Elton John as “The Pinball
Wizar ,” Daltrey as Tommy
and Ann-Margret as his
mother.)

Ann-Margret received
an Oscar nomination for

.'.

Daltrey

in gallons of baked beans
and liquefied chocolate. I
don’t see anybody on Glee
going quite that far for
their art.

MICHAEL’S media
cafe was really swinging
at lunch with David Patrick
Columbia looking everyone
over for his New York
Social Diary, which offers
some of the best content
on the Internet.

And, even I was there,
sitting with the “mayor” of
Michael’s — Joe Armstrong
— who knows everybody
and everything. For the
first time I noted that the
cowboy boot vase on Joe’s
table is autographed by
Willie Nelson, Fats Domino,
Jimmy Buffett and Elton John.

There was another sig-
nature I wondered about
and it turned out to be
that of our fellow Texan,
Laura Bush, who at one
point in time drifted past
Joe’s table and happened
to have a pen out and gave
it her “John Hancoc .”

Joe and I were with
Don Carleton,who collects
writers’ works and memo-
rabilia for the University
of Texas at Austin’s Dolph
Briscoe Center for Ameri-
can History. He is collect-
ing mine as we speak.
Don is a documentary
filmmaker of note and he
also oversaw and helped
write the life story of his
longtime friend, the late
Walter Cronkite. Recently,
he brought out Conversa-
tions with the CBS News
legend and says he misses
the old guy terribly. He

her efforts, not the least of was off to dinner that

which was being bathed

same night with Jane

Fox’s ‘Gle 69 plans remake of “Tommy”

and Morley Safer, whose
papers he is also collect-
ing. He already has those
of Bill Moyers and Dominick
Dunne.

Everybody seems to
be handing over their
accumulations to the
University of Texas, either

to the Briscoe or to the
Harry Ransom Center
for literature, videos and
photographs. Robert De
Niro has given them all of
his movies and archives
because he saw that these
great organizations are
such careful caretakers.
The University of Texas
also houses the works of
Gloria Swanson and George

M. Cohan, as well as Nor-
man Mailer, plus Woodward
and Bernstein.

We were sitting near
publisher Donald Newhouse
and former Ambassador
Carl Spielvogel, the wonder-
ful New York writer and
“Living Landmark” Pete
Hamill, his agent Esther
Newberg, Oprah’s book
person Sara Nelson and

fashions dynamo Fern
Mallis.

In the prize corner was
the legendary influence
maven Peter Brown, who

sped to fame working
with the Beatles, and his
most famous current cli-
ent, Andrew Lloyd Webber of
musical theater.

Andrew told me his
wife, Madeleine, was
arriving to join him any
minute and I had a chance
to say thanks for their
annual Christmas card,
which comes every year
and is a masterpiece of art
in itself.